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usa_map.jpg“The United States must get its own house in order before taking on international cybercrime.” That’s the tough statement from one security firm, after it found that one in six spam emails came from the US of A.

The latest report on trends in spam from IT security firm Sophos analysed all the messages caught in SophosLabs’ global network of spam traps between April and June this year.

The top “Dirty Dozen” in the second quarter of 2009 were: 
1. United States   15.6%
2. Brazil    11.1%
3. Turkey    5.2%
4. India    5.0%
5. South Korea   4.7%
6. Poland    4.2%
7. China (inc. Hong Kong) 4.1%
8. Spain    3.4%
9. Russia    3.2%
10. Italy    2.8%
11. Argentina   2.5%
12. Vietnam   2.3%
[Others 35.9%]

Barack Obama‘s recent speech on cybersecurity emphasised the threat posed by overseas criminals and enemy states, but these figures prove that there is a significant problem in his own back yard,” said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant for Sophos.

“If America could clean up its compromised PCs it would be a considerable benefit to everyone around the world who uses the net. All web users need to properly defend their computers from attack, and pledge to never act upon spam messages.”

In contrast to America’s spam output, Cluley noted that Russia, a former spam super-power, continues to fall down the ranks.

It currently resides in ninth position with 3.2 per cent of spam messages – a significant reduction compared to the same time last year when the country came second only to the United States and was responsible for relaying 7.5 per cent of all spam emails.

Poland has seen the biggest single increase in spam output since the last quarter, moving up from tenth to sixth place in this global “hall of shame”.

Colombia is the only nation to have left the Dirty Dozen since Q1 2009, with Vietnam a new entry this quarter.